Service to Others Accessible Gallery 

Service to others took many forms. Physicians, nurses, and other health and mental healthcare workers immediately come to mind. Service to others can also take many forms, including giving support for small businesses that are struggling to survive or making masks to help protect others. Some took on the challenge of social isolation by developing a creative online mentoring program that engages socially isolated middle and elementary school students. One of the most powerful images was of a physician. He needed to take a break after a long shift, but did not lose sight of the importance of asking others to have “gratitude for the precious opportunities you still have and take care of yourselves.”

Title of Photo: Essential Mother

Name: Jennifer Phung

Ethnicity: Chinese-Vietnamese

Age: 22

Date Image was Captured: 4/25/20

Time Image was Captured: 10:12:00 AM    

Location Image was Captured: Supermarket in Westminster, CA

How would you describe your image, to someone who may be visually impaired? 
This image is my mom dressed in a face shield, protective glasses, face mask, gloves, and long sleeve coverings for her job at the supermarket. 

What does this image mean to you? 
This image is my mom dressed in a face shield, protective glasses, face mask, gloves, and long sleeve coverings. This is how she dresses to work at the supermarket, every day. At first, she was deeply uncomfortable with all the additional coverings she had to adorn but is now used to the feeling after having worked almost every day during the pandemic. Since both my parents work at supermarkets, the concern about contracting the disease is twice as real. The risk, worry and stress are not worth their close to minimum wages. Unfortunately, it is a means to an end. And because they are both already work in risky environments, it would not make sense for me to continue volunteering at health clinics nor starting a job in a lab.  

 

Based on your COVID-19 experience, what would you like to see changed in your world, that may or may not be related to your image? 
Essential workers need to be continued to be in the center of attention to emphasize the very real and imminent risks of COVID. Precautions and protections should NOT be taken lightly. Many have to sacrifice their mental, emotional, and physical well-being so that the world can continue life. Gratitude is not enough. Stay-in orders and isolation are a good start.

Title of Photo: Culturally Quarantined

Name: Orissa Patnaik    

Ethnicity: Asian American (India)    

Age: 16    

Date Image was Captured: 5/29/20    

Time Image was Captured: 3:00:00 PM

Location Image was Captured: Bhubaneswar Odisha - India (my bedroom window)   

 

How would you describe your image, to someone who may be visually impaired? 
It is a selfie of me wearing my traditional ethnic clothing called a Lehenga with detailed mirror work and ornate stitches patterns. I am wearing all Indian traditional silver jewelry and accessories. On my face is a mask to keep me safe from COVID 19 it covers my mouth nose and chin wrapping around my face so that just my dark brown eyes are visible. The mask is of local cloth called Sambalpuri which has an ornate design in a zig zag lined pattern and hand woven by local artisans and stitched by my seamstress who is selling masks to bring in more money to support her large family living in poverty. I am standing in the sunlight facing my bedroom window the metal bars of it cast a shadow on me. Outside all is completely still due to the 2 month strict lockdown being enforced all over India since mid-March. Today we had a puja and even though we can’t go out I dressed up anyway.     

 

What does this image mean to you? 
My culture is something I am extremely proud of as an Asian American (India). Apart from this, I chose this picture because every single accessory is from the local market from where I live in India. In the terribly tough times this pandemic has brought upon us, I would like to encourage everyone to stay safe (expressed by the mask) and continue to help the lesser privileged (expressed by the accessories and the top) by supporting them financially buying their goods which is really all we can do. I bought this mask from my seamstress I am sure she is struggling to make ends meet so has started this new form of entrepreneurship selling face masks. She has a tiny shack for a workplace and clearly does wonders with her work. With all that has been going on, masks have become our everyday wear. To me, they are like an accessory now just like the jewelry I am wearing!

 

Based on your COVID-19 experience, what would you like to see changed in your world, that may or may not be related to your image? 
Outreach toward the less fortunate. Helping in any way we can. I am lucky to have been born in an affluent family but most aren’t in India. Purchasing the mask I am wearing and the other 11 I got to give to my friends that live in my apartment building ensures that the local seamstress I bought them from and her family will have food on the table for the next month even during the pandemic. As a teenager this is all I can do for now. I am happy to do it.

 

Title of Photo: Face Shield Making

Name: Jennifer Phung    

Ethnicity: Chinese-Vietnamese

Age: 22    

Date Image was Captured: 4/14/20

Time Image was Captured: 4:36:00 PM

Location Image was Captured: Westminster, CA

How would you describe your image, to someone who may be visually impaired? 
Hand-made face shields made of foam, elastic, staples and clear plastic lined up.      

What does this image mean to you? 
This image represents the time of early quarantine when face masks and face shields were in low supply but very high demand. I can vividly remember my parents expressing to me their concerns about not having proper, let alone any, personal protective equipment. Even more concerning, was the fact that the individual supermarkets where they work did not enact any measures to provide their cashiers safety. Beyond that, most of my parents' co-workers had difficulty obtaining face shields and masks, despite all of them continuing to work their usual hours. Thus, I took it upon myself to hand-make 100 face shields to be donated to my employees of both supermarkets with the comfort and effectiveness in mind.    

Based on your COVID-19 experience, what would you like to see changed in your world, that may or may not be related to your image? Accessibility to resources should be equal. Grocery stores, supermarkets and all essential business should care for the well-being of their employees. Everyone deserves to be safe or have the means to protect themselves. 

Title of Photo: Keep Calm and MentorOn

Name: Toby Ting

Ethnicity: Chinese-American

Age: 15    

Date Image was Captured: 3/28/20

Time Image was Captured: 2:00:00 PM

Title of Photo: At Your Service

Name: Arlene Tieng            

Location Image was Captured: New York

Title of Image: Masked

Name: Calvin Sun

Ethnicity: Chinese American

Age: 33

Date Image was Captured: 4/13/20

Time Image was Captured: 7:00:00 PM

Location Image was Captured: Lenox Health Greenwich Village ER    

How would you describe your image, to someone who may be visually impaired? 
Calvin D. Sun, MD outside his shift during 7PM applause in NYC, amidst COVID-19 pandemic.

What does this image mean to you? 
Stepped outside in the middle of my ER shift on Monday, April 13th to take a moment to myself: I needed to breathe. I needed to know if I was still alive.

Since then and within 50 days I’ve worked 35 shifts (all 10-12 hours long) across numerous ERs in mostly The Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn (and a few in Manhattan), added 3 new ERs to my roster, met so many supporters, while also losing colleagues, friends, and my grandfather to COVID-19.

As patient volumes are now decreasing and I have much fewer shifts needing to be filled, I take pause to reflect on the souls and the innocence we’ve lost. And as bury our dead, tend to the injured, and process all the emotions we had held off during the first surge, we also brace ourselves for the possible next wave.

But alas even if there would be no next wave, life is life, and there always will be “a next wave.” Whether it’s more COVID-19 patients, the patients that waited too long for care, the rising mental health toll, the livelihoods lost, the next pandemic, or the next disaster, those of us remaining will keep holding the line so we can all see to another tomorrow.

Until then, channel gratitude for the precious opportunities you still have and don’t forget to take a moment to yourselves right now. Don’t forget to breathe. Don’t forget to live: All you got is right now. This world doesn’t wait for anyone.

 

Based on your COVID-19 experience, what would you like to see changed in your world, that may or may not be related to your image? 
As we continue to mourn the innocence and those that we've lost, so must we look forward responsibly without disrespecting the sacrifices made. Channel gratitude for the precious opportunities you still have and don’t forget to take a moment to yourselves right now. Don’t forget to breathe. Don’t forget to live: All you got is right now. This world doesn’t wait for anyone.

Title of Photo: Shining A Light

Name: DJ Ida

Ethnicity: Japanese American    

Date Image was Captured: 6/2/20

Time Image was Captured: 11:00:00 AM

Location Image was Captured: my living room

How would you describe your image, to someone who may be visually impaired?
A lamp sits on an end table softly shining a light on a collection of Japanese folk toys.

What does this image mean to you?
On May 15, NAAPIMHA put together a virtual round table "Shining A Light on API Mental Health" to raise awareness around mental health that doesn't just focus on diagnosis.  We also wanted to shine a light on hate crimes against Asian Americans, the importance of showing solidarity with Black Lives Matter, voting, the census... I chose this image because it is shining a light on my collection of Japanese folk toys because I firmly believe that Mental HEALTH is also celebrating who we are as Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders. Claiming who we are is a way to fight racism and take away the power of those who chose to see us through a racist lens.

Based on your COVID-19 experience, what would you like to see changed in your world, that may or may not be related to your image? 
Hopefully we can eliminate the stigma surrounding mental health. It is imperative that we advocate to increase resources for our community-based organizations that provide culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health services using a broader public health approach, respecting the strength of the community, not just focusing on the problems.

Title of Photo: Protest & Sanitize

Name: Sriya Bhattacharyya

Ethnicity: South Asian - Indian

Age: 33

Date Image was Captured: 6/4/20

Time Image was Captured: 5:27:00 PM

Location Image was Captured: Bronx, NY Inside of Montefiore Hospital Emotional Support Center

How would you describe your image, to someone who may be visually impaired? 
This photo is of the hand sanitizer bottle on top of emotional support resources, taken inside of the emotional support center at Montefiore Medical Center. The post it note on the bottle reads, "Standing in solidarity with Black Lives at the 210th Street Entrance...BRB."

What does this image mean to you? 
I took this photograph a few minutes before a demonstration held outside of Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx, one of the hardest hit COVID-19 hospitals, witnessing a disproportionate number of deaths in Black communities. The demonstration was kneeling from 8 minutes and 46 seconds, the same amount of time it took for an officer in Minneapolis to murder George Floyd. It highlights how emotional support is standing with those most affected, not just to validate their emotions, but to resist the horrific realities Black colleagues and community members face.

Based on your COVID-19 experience, what would you like to see changed in your world, that may or may not be related to your image? 
Anti-Black racism and white supremacy. I'd like to see collective mobilization and movements toward liberation. I'd like to see the goals of the Black Visions Collective realized, and I'd like Asian Americans to stop trying to aspire toward whiteness and instead stand with our Black brothers and sisters.

Title of Photo: PPE

Name: Kiyoshi Yamazaki

Ethnicity: Japanese American

Date Image was Captured: 5/16/20

Time Image was Captured: 12:22:00 PM

How would you describe your image, to someone who may be visually impaired?
Japanese American Physician in PPE

What does this image mean to you? 
Here to safely heal, serve, and protect the community.

Based on your COVID-19 experience, what would you like to see changed in your world, that may or may not be related to your image?
We’re all in this together no matter our ethnicity, socioeconomic background, or gender.

 

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